Insects

What to Know About October Yellow Jackets and Other Stinging Insects


What do you think of when someone mentions fall? Crunchy leaves, crisp air, or the pumpkin patch? Well, Spring Lake Exterminators think of stinging pests like wasps, mosquitoes, and yellow jackets.

Often we associate those stinging pests with warmer weather and in most cases that is true. However, you must be on the lookout for yellow jackets even in the month of October as they’re still on the hunt for their next meal!

Just because the weather has cooled off doesn’t mean all the pests have left just yet.

A Place To Sleep

When cool air starts to set in, the queen yellow jacket begins to look for a place for the hive to rest until Spring. This could mean they make their way into your home through small holes or open spaces to create their new nest. While this is a plus for the hive, living with yellow jackets is not the best way to spend your winter.

If you find several yellow jackets buzzing around, make sure to contact Spring Lake Exterminators to assess the issue so there aren’t any unexpected roommates this season.

Where’s My Dinner?

While the queen searches for a place for the hive to rest, the worker yellow jackets are in search of food. During this time they can become much more aggressive if they find any sugary food that was left out, so make sure you store that sweet fall apple pie tightly and away.

The less opportunity yellow jackets are given to find those sweet treats the less likely you are to come across them, so make sure you’re keeping an eye on what you leave open. Call your Spring Lake Exterminators today to ensure your house is sealed and protected against these unwanted guests.

Your Spring Lake Exterminator is Here to Help!

No matter the weather, stinging pests can always show up and cause a  ruckus, so make sure you’re ready for this winter season and call Allison Pest Control! Your Spring Lake Exterminators are standing by to take your call.

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